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  • Advagraf
    / Astellas


    Active Ingredient
    Tacrolimus 0.5, 1, 3, 5 mg

    Status in Israel
    RX

    Presentation and Status in Health Basket

    Presentation Basket Yarpa Pharmasoft

    Prolonged-Release Capsules

    50 X 0.5 mg

    partial basket chart 74113 9817

    Prolonged-Release Capsules

    50 X 1 mg

    partial basket chart 74114 9818

    Prolonged-Release Capsules

    50 X 3 mg

    partial basket chart 74115 9819

    Prolonged-Release Capsules

    50 X 5 mg

    partial basket chart 74123 9820

    Related information


    Dosage

    This is a once-a-day oral formulation of tacrolimus. The therapy requires careful monitoring by adequately qualified and equipped personnel. This medicinal product should only be prescribed, and changes in immunosuppressive therapy initiated, by physicians experienced in immunosuppressive therapy and the management of transplant patients.
    Inadvertent, unintentional or unsupervised switching of immediate- or prolonged-release formulations of tacrolimus is unsafe. This can lead to graft rejection or increased incidence of adverse reactions, including under- or over immune-suppression, due to clinically relevant differences in systemic exposure to tacrolimus. Patients should be maintained on a single formulation of tacrolimus with the corresponding daily dosing regimen; alterations in formulation or regimen should only take place under the close supervision of a transplant specialist. Following conversion to any alternative formulation, therapeutic drug monitoring must be performed and dose adjustments made to ensure that systemic exposure to tacrolimus is maintained.
    The recommended initial doses presented below are intended to act solely as a guideline. Tacrolimus is routinely administered in conjunction with other immunosuppressive agents in the initial post-operative period. The dose may vary depending upon the immunosuppressive regimen chosen. Tacrolimus dosing should primarily be based on clinical assessments of rejection and tolerability in each patient individually aided by blood level monitoring. If clinical signs of rejection are apparent, alteration of the immunosuppressive regimen should be considered.
    In de novo kidney and liver transplant patients AUC0-24 of tacrolimus for this formulation on Day 1 was 30% and 50% lower respectively, when compared with that for the immediate release capsules (Prograf) at equivalent doses. By Day 4, systemic exposure as measured by trough levels is similar for both kidney and liver transplant patients with both formulations. Careful and frequent monitoring of tacrolimus trough levels is recommended in the first two weeks post-transplant with this drug  to ensure adequate drug exposure in the immediate post-transplant period. As tacrolimus is a substance with low clearance, adjustments to the drug dose regimen may take several days before steady state is achieved.
    To suppress graft rejection, immune-suppression must be maintained; consequently, no limit to the duration of oral therapy can be given.
    Prophylaxis of kidney transplant rejection: Drug therapy should commence at a dose of 0.20 – 0.30 mg/kg/day administered once daily in the morning. Administration should commence within 24 hours after the completion of surgery. Doses are usually reduced in the post-transplant period. It is possible in some cases to withdraw concomitant immunosuppressive therapy, leading to drug monotherapy. Post-transplant changes in the condition of the patient may alter the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus and may necessitate further dose adjustments.
    Prophylaxis of liver transplant rejection: Therapy should commence at a dose of 0.10 – 0.20 mg/kg/day administered once daily in the morning. Administration should commence approximately 12-18 hours after the completion of surgery. Doses are usually reduced in the post-transplant period. It is possible in some cases to withdraw concomitant immunosuppressive therapy, leading to drug  monotherapy. Post-transplant improvement in the condition of the patient may alter the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus and may necessitate further dose adjustments.
    Conversion of Prograf-treated patients to this formulation therapyAllograft transplant patients maintained on twice daily Prograf capsules dosing requiring conversion to once daily Advagraf should be converted on a 1:1 (mg:mg) total daily dose basis. Advagraf should be administered in the morning.
    Conversion from ciclosporin to tacrolimus: For full details see prescribing information.
    Treatment of allograft rejection: Increased doses of tacrolimus, supplemental corticosteroid therapy, and introduction of short courses of mono-/polyclonal antibodies have all been used to manage rejection episodes. If signs of toxicity such as severe adverse reactions are noted, the dose of this drug  may need to be reduced.
    Treatment of allograft rejection after kidney or liver transplantation: For conversion from other immune-suppressants to this agent once daily, treatment should begin with the initial oral dose recommended in kidney and liver transplantation respectively for prophylaxis of transplant rejection.
    Therapeutic drug monitoring: Dosing should primarily be based on clinical assessments of rejection and tolerability in each individual patient aided by whole blood tacrolimus trough level monitoring. See prescribing information for full details.
    Hepatic impairment: Dose reduction may be necessary in patients with severe liver impairment in order to maintain the tacrolimus blood trough levels within the recommended target range.
    Renal impairment: As the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus are unaffected by renal function, no dose adjustment is required. However, owing to the nephrotoxic potential of tacrolimus careful monitoring of renal function is recommended (including serial serum creatinine concentrations, calculation of creatinine clearance and monitoring of urine output).
    Race: In comparison to Caucasians, black patients may require higher tacrolimus doses to achieve similar trough levels.
    Gender: There is no evidence that male and female patients require different doses to achieve similar trough levels.
    Older peoples: There is no evidence currently available to indicate that dosing should be adjusted in older people.
    Paediatric patients: The safety and efficacy of this drug in children under 18 years of age have not yet been established. Limited data are available but no recommendation on a posology can be made.
    Method of administration: It is recommended that the oral daily dose be administered once daily in the morning. This prolonged-release hard capsules should be taken immediately following removal from the blister. Patients should be advised not to swallow the desiccant. The capsules should be swallowed whole with fluid (preferably water). It should generally be administered on an empty stomach or at least 1 hour before or 2 to 3 hours after a meal, to achieve maximal absorption. A forgotten morning dose should be taken as soon as possible on the same day. A double dose should not be taken on the next morning.
    For full details see prescribing information.


    Indications

    Prophylaxis of transplant rejection in adult kidney or liver allograft recipients. Treatment of allograft rejection resistant to treatment with other immunosuppressive medicinal products in adult kidney or liver allograft recipient patients.


    Contra-Indications

    Hypersensitivity to tacrolimus, or to any of the excipients. Hypersensitivity to other macrolides.


    Special Precautions

    Medication errors, including inadvertent, unintentional or unsupervised substitution of immediate- or prolonged-release tacrolimus formulations, have been observed. This has led to serious adverse reactions, including graft rejection, or other adverse reactions which could be a consequence of either under- or over-exposure to tacrolimus. Patients should be maintained on a single formulation of tacrolimus with the corresponding daily dosing regimen; alterations in formulation or regimen should only take place under the close supervision of a transplant specialist.
    Gastrointestinal disorders: Gastro-intestinal perforation has been reported in patients treated with tacrolimus. As gastrointestinal perforation is a medically important event that may lead to a life-threatening or serious condition, adequate treatments should be considered immediately after suspected symptoms or signs occur. Since levels of tacrolimus in blood may significantly change during diarrhoea episodes, extra monitoring of tacrolimus concentrations is recommended during episodes of diarrhoea.
    Cardiac disorders: Ventricular hypertrophy or hypertrophy of the septum, reported as cardiomyopathies, have been observed in Prograf treated patients on rare occasions and may also occur with Advagraf. Most cases have been reversible, occurring with tacrolimus blood trough concentrations much higher than the recommended maximum levels. Other factors observed to increase the risk of these clinical conditions included preexisting heart disease, corticosteroid usage, hypertension, renal or hepatic dysfunction, infections, fluid overload, and oedema. Accordingly, high-risk patients receiving substantial immunosuppression should be monitored, using such procedures as echocardiography or ECG pre- and post-transplant (e.g. initially at 3 months and then at 9 -12 months). If abnormalities develop, dose reduction of Advagraf, or change of treatment to another immunosuppressive agent should be considered. Tacrolimus may prolong the QT interval and may cause Torsades de Pointes. Caution should be exercised in patients with risk factors for QT prolongation, including patients with a personal or family history of QT prolongation, congestive heart failure, bradyarrhythmias and electrolyte abnormalities. Caution should also be exercised in patients diagnosed or suspected to have Congenital Long QT Syndrome or acquired QT prolongation or patients on concomitant medications known to prolong the QT interval, induce electrolyte abnormalities or known to increase tacrolimus exposure. 
    Lymphoproliferative disorders and malignancies: Patients treated with tacrolimus have been reported to develop Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV)-associated lympho-proliferative disorders.
    Pure Red Cell Aplasia: Cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported in patients treated with tacrolimus. All patients reported risk factors for PRCA such as parvovirus B19 infection, underlying disease or concomitant medications associated with PRCA.
    For full details see prescribing information.


    Side Effects

    The most commonly reported adverse reactions (occurring in > 10% of patients) are tremor, renal impairment, hyperglycaemic conditions, diabetes mellitus, hyperkalaemia, infections, hypertension and insomnia.
    For full details see prescribing information.


    Drug interactions

    Systemically available tacrolimus is metabolised by hepatic CYP3A4. There is also evidence of gastrointestinal metabolism by CYP3A4 in the intestinal wall. Concomitant use of substances known to inhibit or induce CYP3A4 may affect the metabolism of tacrolimus and thereby increase or decrease tacrolimus blood levels. It is strongly recommended to closely monitor tacrolimus blood levels, as well as QT prolongation (with ECG), renal function and other side effects, whenever substances which have the potential to alter CYP3A4 metabolism or otherwise influence tacrolimus blood levels are used concomitantly, and to interrupt or adjust the tacrolimus dose as appropriate in order to maintain similar tacrolimus exposure.
    CYP3A4 inhibitors potentially leading to increased tacrolimus blood levels: Clinically the following substances have been shown to increase tacrolimus blood levels: Strong interactions have been observed with antifungal agents such as ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin, HIV protease inhibitors (e.g. ritonavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir) or HCV protease inhibitors (e.g. telaprevir, boceprevir). Concomitant use of these substances may require decreased tacrolimus doses in nearly all patients. Pharmacokinetics studies have indicated that the increase in blood levels is mainly a result of increase in oral bioavailability of tacrolimus owing to the inhibition of gastrointestinal metabolism. Effect on hepatic clearance is less pronounced. Weaker interactions have been observed with clotrimazole, clarithromycin, josamycin, nifedipine, nicardipine, diltiazem, verapamil, amiodarone, danazol, ethinylestradiol, omeprazole and nefazodone. In vitro the following substances have been shown to be potential inhibitors of tacrolimus metabolism: bromocriptine, cortisone, dapsone, ergotamine, gestodene, lidocaine, mephenytoin, miconazole, midazolam, nilvadipine, norethindrone, quinidine, tamoxifen, (triacetyl)oleandomycin. Grapefruit juice has been reported to increase the blood level of tacrolimus and should therefore be avoided. Lansoprazole and ciclosporin may potentially inhibit CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of tacrolimus and thereby increase tacrolimus whole blood concentrations.
    Other interactions potentially leading to increased tacrolimus blood levels: Tacrolimus is extensively bound to plasma proteins. Possible interactions with other active substances known to have high affinity for plasma proteins should be considered (e.g., NSAIDs, oral anticoagulants, or oral antidiabetics). Other potential interactions that may increase systemic exposure of tacrolimus include prokinetic agents (such as metoclopramide and cisapride), cimetidine and magnesium-aluminium-hydroxide.
    CYP3A4 inducers potentially leading to decreased tacrolimus blood levels: Clinically the following substances have been shown to decrease tacrolimus blood levels: Strong interactions have been observed with rifampicin, phenytoin, St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum) which may require increased tacrolimus doses in almost all patients. Clinically significant interactions have also been observed with phenobarbital. Maintenance doses of corticosteroids have been shown to reduce tacrolimus blood levels. High dose prednisolone or methylprednisolone administered for the treatment of acute rejection have the potential to increase or decrease tacrolimus blood levels. Carbamazepine, metamizole and isoniazid have the potential to decrease tacrolimus concentrations.
    Effect of tacrolimus on the metabolism of other medicinal products: Tacrolimus is a known CYP3A4 inhibitor; thus concomitant use of tacrolimus with medicinal products known to be metabolised by CYP3A4 may affect the metabolism of such medicinal products. The half-life of ciclosporin is prolonged when tacrolimus is given concomitantly. In addition, synergistic/additive nephrotoxic effects can occur. For these reasons, the combined administration of ciclosporin and tacrolimus is not recommended and care should be taken when administering tacrolimus to patients who have previously received ciclosporin . Tacrolimus has been shown to increase the blood level of phenytoin. As tacrolimus may reduce the clearance of steroid-based contraceptives leading to increased hormone exposure, particular care should be exercised when deciding upon contraceptive measures. Limited knowledge of interactions between tacrolimus and statins is available. Clinical data suggest that the pharmacokinetics of statins are largely unaltered by the co-administration of tacrolimus. Animal data have shown that tacrolimus could potentially decrease the clearance and increase the half-life of pentobarbital and antipyrine.
    Other interactions leading to clinically detrimental effects: Concurrent use of tacrolimus with medicinal products known to have nephrotoxic or neurotoxic effects may increase these effects (e.g., aminoglycosides, gyrase inhibitors, vancomycin, cotrimoxazole, NSAIDs, ganciclovir or aciclovir). Enhanced nephrotoxicity has been observed following the administration of amphotericin B and ibuprofen in conjunction with tacrolimus. As tacrolimus treatment may be associated with hyperkalaemia, or may increase pre-existing hyperkalaemia, high potassium intake, or potassium-sparing diuretics (e.g. amiloride, triamterene, or spironolactone) should be avoided. Immunosuppressants may affect the response to vaccination and vaccination during treatment with tacrolimus may be less effective. The use of live attenuated vaccines should be avoided.
    For full details see prescribing information.


    Pregnancy and Lactation

    Pregnancy: Human data show that tacrolimus crosses the placenta. Limited data from organ transplant recipients show no evidence of an increased risk of adverse reactions on the course and outcome of pregnancy under tacrolimus treatment compared with other immunosuppressive medicinal products.
    Lactation: Human data demonstrate that tacrolimus is excreted in breast milk. As detrimental effects on the newborn cannot be excluded, women should not breast-feed whilst receiving Advagraf.


    Overdose

    Experience with overdose is limited. Several cases of accidental overdose have been reported with tacrolimus; symptoms have included tremor, headache, nausea and vomiting, infections, urticaria, lethargy and increases in blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase levels. No specific antidote to tacrolimus therapy is available. If overdose occurs, general supportive measures and symptomatic treatment should be conducted. Based on its high molecular weight, poor aqueous solubility, and extensive erythrocyte and plasma protein binding, it is anticipated that tacrolimus will not be dialysable. In isolated patients with very high plasma levels, haemofiltration or -diafiltration have been effective in reducing toxic concentrations. In cases of oral intoxication, gastric lavage and/or the use of adsorbents (such as activated charcoal) may be helpful, if used shortly after intake.


    Important notes

    Lactose:
    0.5 mg: Each capsule contains 51.09 mg lactose.
    1 mg: Each capsule contains 102.17 mg lactose.
    3 mg: Each capsule contains 306.52 mg lactose.
    5 mg: Each capsule contains 510.9 mg lactose..
    Shelf life: After opening the aluminium wrapper: 1 year.


    Manufacturer
    Astellas Ireland Co. Ltd
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