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  • Attent 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg
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    Active Ingredient *
    Dextroamphetamine Saccharate 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5 mg
    Amphetamine Aspartate Monohydrate 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5 mg
    Dextroamphetamine Sulfate 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5 mg
    Amphetamine Sulfate 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5 mg

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    Tablets

    100 X 5 mg

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    Tablets

    100 X 10 mg

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    Tablets

    Blister: 30 X 10 mg

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    Tablets

    100 X 20 mg

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    Tablets

    Blister: 30 X 20 mg

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    Tablets

    100 X 30 mg

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    Tablets

    Blister: 30 X 30 mg

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    Related information


    Dosage

    Regardless of indication, amphetamines should be administered at the lowest effective dosage and dosage should be individually adjusted according to the therapeutic needs and response of the patient. Late evening doses should be avoided because of the resulting insomnia.
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: 
    Not recommended for children under 3 years of age. 
    Children 6 years of age and older, start with 5 mg once or twice daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. Only in rare cases will it be necessary to exceed a total of 40 mg per day. Give first dose on awakening; additional doses (1 or 2) at intervals of 4 to 6 hours.
    Where possible, drug administration should be interrupted occasionally to determine if there is a recurrence of behavioral symptoms sufficient to require continued therapy.
    Narcolepsy: Usual dose 5 mg to 60 mg per day in divided doses, depending on the individual patient response.
    Narcolepsy seldom occurs in children under 12 years of age; however, when it does, dextroamphetamine sulfate may be used. The suggested initial dose for patients aged 6 to 12 is 5 mg daily; daily dose may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. In patients 12 years of age and older, start with 10 mg daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 10 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. If bothersome adverse reactions appear (e.g., insomnia or anorexia), dosage should be reduced. Give first dose on awakening; additional doses (1 or 2) at intervals of 4 to 6 hours.


    Indications

    Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Narcolepsy.
    See prescribing information for full details.


    Contra-Indications

    ‐ Advanced arteriosclerosis, symptomatic cardiovascular disease, moderate to severe hypertension, hyperthyroidism, known hypersensitivity or idiosyncrasy to the sympathomimetic amines, or to any of the excipients, glaucoma
    ‐ Agitated states
    ‐ Patients with a history of drug abuse
    ‐ During or within 14 days following the administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (hypertensive crises may result).


    Special Precautions

    Serious Cardiovascular Events:
    Sudden Death and Pre-existing Structural Cardiac Abnormalities or Other Serious Heart Problems:
    Children and Adolescents: Sudden death has been reported in association with CNS stimulant treatment at usual doses in children and adolescents with structural cardiac abnormalities or other serious heart problems.
    Adults: Sudden deaths, stroke, and myocardial infarction have been reported in adults taking stimulant drugs at usual doses for ADHD. Although the role of stimulants in these adult cases is also unknown, adults have a greater likelihood than children of having serious structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart rhythm abnormalities, coronary artery disease, or other serious cardiac problems.
    Hypertension and other Cardiovascular Conditions: Stimulant medications cause a modest increase in average blood pressure (about 2 to 4 mmHg) and average heart rate (about 3 to 6 bpm), and individuals may have larger increases. While the mean changes alone would not be expected to have short-term consequences, all patients should be monitored for larger changes in heart rate and blood pressure. Caution is indicated in treating patients whose underlying medical conditions might be compromised by increases in blood pressure or heart rate, e.g., those with pre-existing hypertension, heart failure, recent myocardial infarction, or ventricular arrhythmia.
    Psychiatric Adverse Events:
    Pre-Existing Psychosis:
    Administration of stimulants may exacerbate symptoms of behavior disturbance and thought disorder in patients with pre-existing psychotic disorder.
    Bipolar Illness: Particular care should be taken in using stimulants to treat ADHD patients with comorbid bipolar disorder because of concern for possible induction of mixed/manic episode in such patients. Prior to initiating treatment with a stimulant, patients with comorbid depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression.
    Emergence of New Psychotic or Manic Symptoms: Treatment emergent psychotic or manic symptoms, e.g., hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania in children and adolescents without prior history of psychotic illness or mania can be caused by stimulants at usual doses. If such symptoms occur, consideration should be given to a possible causal role of the stimulant, and discontinuation of treatment may be appropriate.
    Aggression: Aggressive behavior or hostility is often observed in children and adolescents with ADHD, and has been reported in clinical trials and the post-marketing experience of some medications indicated for the treatment of ADHD. Although there is no systematic evidence that stimulants cause aggressive behavior or hostility, patients beginning treatment for ADHD should be monitored for the appearance of or worsening of aggressive behavior or hostility.
    Long-Term Suppression of Growth: Careful follow-up of weight and height in children ages 7 to 10 years who were randomized to either methylphenidate or non-medication treatment groups over 14 months, as well as in naturalistic subgroups of newly methylphenidate-treated and non-medication treated children over 36 months (to the ages of 10 to 13 years), suggests that consistently medicated children (i.e., treatment for 7 days per week throughout the year) have a temporary slowing in growth rate (on average, a total of about 2 cm less growth in height and 2.7 kg less growth in weight over 3 years), without evidence of growth rebound during this period of development.
    See prescribing information for full details.


    Side Effects

    Cardiovascular: Palpitations, tachycardia, elevation of blood pressure, sudden death, myocardial infarction.
    There have been isolated reports of cardiomyopathy associated with chronic amphetamine use.
    Central Nervous System: Psychotic episodes at recommended doses, overstimulation, restlessness, irritability, dizziness, insomnia, euphoria, dyskinesia, dysphoria, depression, aggression, anger, logorrhea, dermatillomania,, tremor, headache, exacerbation of motor and phonic tics and
    Tourette’s syndrome, seizures, stroke.
    Eye Disorders: Vision blurred, mydriasis.
    Gastrointestinal: Dryness of the mouth, unpleasant taste, diarrhea, constipation, other gastrointestinal disturbances. Anorexia and weight loss may occur as undesirable effects.
    Allergic: Urticaria, rash, hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema and anaphylaxis. Serious skin rashes, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported.
    Endocrine: Impotence, changes in libido, frequent or prolonged erections.
    Skin: Alopecia.
    Musculoskeletal: Rhabdomyolysis.


    Drug interactions

    Acidifying Agents: Gastrointestinal acidifying agents (guanethidine, reserpine, glutamic acid HCl, ascorbic acid, fruit juices, etc.) lower absorption of amphetamines.
    Urinary Acidifying Agents: (ammonium chloride, sodium acid phosphate, etc.) increase the concentration of the ionized species of the amphetamine molecule, thereby increasing urinary excretion. Both groups of agents lower blood levels and efficacy of amphetamines.
    Adrenergic Blockers: Adrenergic blockers are inhibited by amphetamines.
    Alkalinizing Agents: Gastrointestinal alkalinizing agents (sodium bicarbonate, etc.) increase absorption of amphetamines. Co-administration of ATTENT tablets and gastrointestinal alkalizing agents, such as antacids, should be avoided. Urinary alkalinizing agents (acetazolamide, some thiazides) increase the concentration of the non-ionized species of the amphetamine molecule, thereby decreasing urinary excretion. Both groups of agents increase blood levels and therefore potentiate the actions of amphetamines.
    Antidepressants, tricyclic: Amphetamines may enhance the activity of tricyclic or sympathomimetic agents; d-amphetamine with desipramine or protriptyline and possibly other tricyclics cause striking and sustained increases in the concentration of d-amphetamine in the brain; cardiovascular effects can be potentiated.
    CYP2D6 Inhibitors: The concomitant use of ATTENT tablets and CYP2D6 inhibitors may increase the exposure of ATTENT tablets compared to the use of the drug alone and increase the risk of serotonin syndrome. Initiate with lower doses and monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome particularly during ATTENT tablets initiation and after a dosage increase. If serotonin syndrome occurs, discontinue ATTENT tablets and the CYP2D6 inhibitor. Examples of CYP2D6 Inhibitors include paroxetine and fluoxetine (also serotonergic drugs), quinidine, ritonavir.
    Serotonergic Drugs: The concomitant use of ATTENT tablets and serotonergic drugs increases the risk of serotonin syndrome. Initiate with lower doses and monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome, particularly during ATTENT tablets initiation or dosage increase. If serotonin syndrome occurs, discontinue ATTENT tablets and the concomitant serotonergic drug(s) [see WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS]. Examples of serotonergic drugs include
    selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, St. John’s Wort.
    MAO Inhibitors: MAOI antidepressants, as well as a metabolite of furazolidone, slow amphetamine metabolism. This slowing potentiates amphetamines, increasing their effect on the release of norepinephrine and other monoamines from adrenergic nerve endings; this can cause headaches and other signs of hypertensive crisis. A variety of neurological toxic effects and malignant hyperpyrexia can occur, sometimes with fatal results.
    Antihistamines: Amphetamines may counteract the sedative effect of antihistamines.
    Antihypertensives: Amphetamines may antagonize the hypotensive effects of antihypertensives.
    Chlorpromazine: Chlorpromazine blocks dopamine and norepinephrine receptors, thus inhibiting the central stimulant effects of amphetamines, and can be used to treat amphetamine poisoning.
    Ethosuximide: Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of ethosuximide.
    Haloperidol: Haloperidol blocks dopamine receptors, thus inhibiting the central stimulant effects of amphetamines.
    Lithium Carbonate: The anorectic and stimulatory effects of amphetamines may be inhibited by lithium carbonate.
    Meperidine (Pethidine): Amphetamines potentiate the analgesic effect of meperidine.
    Methenamine Therapy: Urinary excretion of amphetamines is increased, and efficacy is reduced, by acidifying agents used in methenamine therapy.
    Norepinephrine: Amphetamines enhance the adrenergic effect of norepinephrine.
    Phenobarbital: Amphetamine may delay intestinal absorption of phenobarbital; co-administration of phenobarbital may produce a synergistic anticonvulsant action.
    Phenytoin: Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of phenytoin; co-administration of phenytoin may produce a synergistic anticonvulsant action.
    Propoxyphene: In cases of propoxyphene overdose, amphetamine CNS stimulation is potentiated and fatal convulsions can occur.
    Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs): PPIs act on proton pumps by blocking acid production, thereby reducing gastric acidity.
    Veratrum Alkaloids: Amphetamines inhibit the hypotensive effect of veratrum alkaloids.
    Drug/ Laboratory Test Interactions: Amphetamines can cause a significant elevation in plasma corticosteroid levels. This increase is greatest in the evening. Amphetamines may interfere with urinary steroid determinations.


    Pregnancy and Lactation

    Pregnancy: Amphetamines should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.
    Lactation: Amphetamines are excreted in human milk. Mothers taking amphetamines should be advised to refrain from nursing.
    See prescribing information for full details.


    Overdose

    Individual patient response to amphetamines varies widely. While toxic symptoms occasionally occur as an idiosyncrasy at low doses.
    Symptoms: Manifestations of acute overdose with amphetamines include restlessness, tremor, hyperreflexia, rapid respiration, confusion, assaultiveness, hallucinations, panic states, hyperpyrexia and rhabdomyolysis. Fatigue and depression usually follow the central stimulation. Cardiovascular effects include arrhythmias, hypertension or hypotension and circulatory collapse. Gastrointestinal symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Fatal poisoning is usually preceded by convulsions and coma.
    Treatment: Management of acute amphetamine intoxication is largely symptomatic and includes gastric lavage, administration of activated charcoal, administration of a cathartic and sedation. Experience with hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis is inadequate to permit recommendation in this regard. Acidification of the urine increases amphetamine excretion, but is believed to increase risk of acute renal failure if myoglobinuria is present. If acute, severe hypertension complicates amphetamine overdose, administration of intravenous phentolamine has been suggested. However, a gradual drop in blood pressure will usually result when sufficient sedation has been achieved. Chlorpromazine antagonizes the central stimulant effects of amphetamines and can be used to treat amphetamine intoxication.


    Important notes

    Storage: Store below 25oC and protect from light.
    Original package: The desiccant and the cotton should be returned into the flacon each time after opening the flacon; the cap should be closed. The tablets should be dispensed to the patient within 90 days from first opening of the original pack.
    Alternative pack: the tablets might be dispensed to the patient in an alternative pack, according to the prescribed dose. The tablets should not be used if more than 60 days have lapsed from the dispensing of the tablets.

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